Why Prosthesis?

Prosthetics Explained

A Prosthesis is a term for the component, which replaces the body part lost to injury or illness.

Although nothing can ever completely replace any component of our bodies, most people who have suffered the loss of an individual part or who have been born missing something that everybody else gets and needs like a foot or a hand would concur that something is generally better than nothing. Both Prosthetists and prosthesis play a major part in the rehabilitation of amputees.

A fantastic prosthetic aid is something personalized for an amputee especially the design of sockets. The first goal is to find the natural posture of the stump when standing. WHO estimates that in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, more than 25 million people require prosthetic limbs, while the United States has more than 2 million amputee population with approximately 507 surgical removals of limbs occurring each day.

The use of prosthesis leg is related to employment and a better quality of life, which has led to a decrease in secondary health complications like obesity and, therefore, to greater movement and functional independence for people with amputation.

This means that prosthesis has a shorter lifespan–less than two years—compared to their counterparts in the developed countries, purely due to environmental considerations.

Your support matters

With the cost of manufacturing prosthetics varying, it becomes apparent that the solution for low-income countries is the recycling of parts and components for use by those less fortunate; even as they have to contend with the unique characteristic features on the surface of the rural environments and tropical climates in which they live.

The only affordable, viable, scalable option to fit more people with quality brands like Össur and Ottobock has to be to take in used prosthesis components from developed countries.

Used prosthetic limbs are full of valuable metals, which can be recycled, redesigned and refitted: Otherwise, they would be discarded, since they cannot be reused due to medical waste laws under health regulations.

Our perfect recycling project incorporates a green approach to the use of recycling and dissemination of the thousands of prosthetic limb components discarded every year.

Thank you to all of our recent generous donors:

BN

Bennie Njoku

$150.00 March 24, 2020
SJ

Sally Johnson

$50.00 February 2, 2020
BN

Bennie Njoku

$50.00 February 2, 2020
LA

Laura Anton

$100.00 February 2, 2020
SJ

Sally Johnson

$1,000.00 February 2, 2020
js

john smith

$50.00 February 2, 2020
BN

Bennie Njoku

$150.00 February 2, 2020
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